Socialcompact » Overview

Salzburg Global Seminar, in partnership with specialist international institutions, has developed a multi-year program on the roles of states and families in meeting 21st century social investment needs.
 
Intergenerational and gender justice and inclusion of marginalized populations are critical for social cohesion but come under particular strain where economic systems are confronting a "double squeeze" - how to improve start of life opportunities for all while also caring and paying for aging societies. In many countries, the greatest burden falls on the family unit; government support, where provided, is inconsistently managed between various organizations and seldom reflects forward-thinking best practices. We believe that states' and families' abilities to confront these challenges will shape 21st century economic systems, societal norms and individual wellbeing.
 
Designing a social compact’s added value is its capacity to rapidly address critical bottlenecks to progress - as identified by leading researchers, practitioners and policy makers - and link results to strategic decision points within each sector.


Penny Low – “In this session, we have seen how many people are involved and concerned with creating better public spaces”
Penny Low – “In this session, we have seen how many people are involved and concerned with creating better public spaces”
Andrea Abellan 
Coming from Singapore, reported to be the greenest city in Asia, Penny Low speaks from experience when she talks about the characteristics an eco-friendly city should have. The former parliamentarian and founder of the of the Social Innovation Park (SIP),  attended Salzburg Global’s session The Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play, to share her views on sustainable urban development with a cross-sector mix of international fellows.What are the key factors which have made Singapore an eco-friendly metropolis and one of the most livable cities in the world? Low has no doubt: people. For her, the limited number of natural resources in the country has traditionally promoted biggest levels of investment on what she likes to call “resources standing on two legs,” or in other words, human beings. Becoming independent only in 1965, the rapid growth Singapore has experienced has continued to receive international attention. According to Low, a dynamic, livable environment together with visionary leadership, have both managed to attract the international and national talent responsible for ensuring the country’s progressive development. “Singapore is built to be a peaceful, inspirational place where people want to live and stay,” Low says.SIP, started by Low almost eleven years ago, seeks to boost the sustainable growth of the country by running multiple programs. This includes the Global Social Innovators Forum (GSIF) where social innovators and entrepreneurs share their ideas on sustainable social impact, and the SEED program – Social Entrepreneurship and Eco-park Development - a social innovator hub. The latter includes other projects such as the promotion of community farming spaces and the management of several restaurants employing marginalized communities. Each of these restaurants has a social mission, ranging from ‘Support Sustainable Living,’ and ‘Strengthen Communities’ to ‘Inspire Positive Change.’ In each of the restaurants it is possible to reserve drinks and meals for any person who might be in need of them. This green, social concept is attracting the attention of the media and Singaporeans. One of Low’s most acknowledged works is her support in the expansion of Punggol city, a residential area located in the North-East of Singapore. Low explains how she planned to revitalize the area that was suffering from a deep crisis in the housing market. The “Punggol 21” plan was developed to build a better space that would make citizens feel engaged and comfortable. The project enhanced the creation of recreational facilities, public open spaces, and better transportation services. It also fostered the Punggol Waterway which provides waterfront spaces and extensive green areas. Punggol is appealing to young families, which means a large number of facilities addressed to satisfy children’s demands have been built as well. Aside from numerous kindergartens, schools and childcare centers, Punggol also looks for open spaces which the elderly can enjoy too. As Low explains, the city aims to satisfy every generation, leading to an “intergenerational bonding” which allows every citizen to find their own space in the city to feel relaxed. Over the last few years, Punggol, considered the first eco-town in the tropics, has grown from 2,000 housing units to 65,000. What makes Low feel more positive regarding the future is, again, her trust in people: “People are both the solutions providers and the challenges makers. In this session, we have seen how many people are involved and concerned with creating better public spaces. [That’s] what makes me feel very positive.” However, she is also aware of the obstacles that Singapore still has to cope. Penny Low was a participant in the Salzburg Global program The Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play, which is part of the multi-year Parks for the Planet Forum, a series held in partnership with the IUCN. The session was supported by the Huffington Foundation, Parks Canada and Korea National Park and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/574
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Making A Statement
Making A Statement
Patrick Wilson 
Since its founding in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has been dedicated to bringing some of the most insightful and original voices together to share ideas and accelerate improvements to the world we live in.  One way Salzburg Global harnesses the expertise and energy of our Fellows and partners is to develop “Salzburg Statements”.  These calls-to-action give clear recommendations to key stakeholders to influence policy and advance key actions for shared goals.   “Our programs tackle issues that are highly complex, involving many different stakeholders and levels of intervention,” notes Clare Shine, Vice President and Chief Program Officer. “A Salzburg Statement can distill this into a clear and compelling case for change. This provides real value-add to partners and Fellows who are often under extreme pressure in their day to day operations.”    Collaboration has always been central to Salzburg Global’s work. Salzburg Statements are co-drafted by Fellows and our own program and communications staff, ensuring shared investment and ownership as well as direct relevance for priorities on the ground and at policy level. By drawing on expertise and insights from across geographies, sectors, and generations, the resulting Statements are unusually representative of different perspectives and cultures.   Earlier Salzburg Statements have included the 2011 Salzburg Statement on Shared Decision-Making, which was submitted by health advocates as evidence to the Public Bill Committee of the UK’s Health and Social Care Act (2012), and the 2014 Salzburg Statement on New Dynamics in Global Trade Architecture: The WTO, G20 and Regional Trade Agreements, presented at the annual OECD Forum in Paris.   In 2015, Salzburg Global expanded its production of Salzburg Statements, offering recommendations on issues from data use in health care to human rights violations in North Korea:  The Salzburg Statement on Advancing Innovation and Equity in Aging Societies; The Salzburg Statement on Quality Early Childhood Development and Education for All Girls and Boys; The Salzburg Statement on Realizing the Promise of Data in Health Care;  The Salzburg Statement on the Human Rights Situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea); The Salzburg Challenge for Nature, Health, and a New Urban Generation; The Salzburg Statement on Realizing Human Potential through Better Use of Assessment and Data in Education.  The joint drafting process motivates Fellows to proactively disseminate Statements to their networks after leaving Salzburg, urging their peers into action.  After the session International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity: The Case of North Korea, the Statement –  written with input from the three Commissioners of the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea – was translated into Korean, featured on Voice of America’s Korean-language service, and rapidly published by the Korea Economic Institute of America, the Germany-based DPRK rights NGO Saram, and the dedicated news service, NK News.   The Salzburg Statement on Realizing Human Potential through Better Use of Assessment and Data in Education was the front-page feature of TES, one of the UK’s widest-read education publications and the world’s largest online community of teachers.  The recommendations of the Salzburg Statement on Advancing Innovation and Equity in Aging Societies were featured in the bi-weekly column of Salzburg Global Fellow Gerardo Esquivel Hernandez in El Universal, Mexico’s most read newspaper.  Fellows also use Salzburg Statements to leverage their professional effectiveness.    Sherrie Pugh, a consultant with Vital Aging Network (a community wellness project for over 50s) and a member of the Minnesota Board on Aging and ACT Alzheimer State Leadership, used the Salzburg Statement on Advancing Innovation and Equity in Aging Societies in her presentation to Minnesota legislators. She hopes her proposals will be included in a 2017 bill that aims to create a holistic approach to aging societies, and now she plans to run for political office in the November 2016 elections to lead even deeper policy change on this issue.  Since participating in the symposium International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity: The Challenge of North Korea, James Burt, a UK research and policy officer for The European Alliance for Human Rights in North Korea, has acted on the recommendations of the resulting Salzburg Statement. Burt’s charity – Human Atlas – designed, organized, and sponsored a conference on North Korean women and girls held in the UK’s Houses of Parliament in London. The conference assembled exiled North Koreans and global experts in gender issues, women’s rights, and human rights to discuss the often overlooked stories of the women and girls of North Korea.   Charlotte Cole of the US-based Blue Butterfly Collaborative used the Salzburg Statement on Quality Early Childhood Development and Education for All Girls and Boys as a resource while co-producing a new children’s media series in Haiti. The series, Lakou Kajou, is designed for kindergarteners and first graders and promotes a range of early childhood curricular skills. FELLOWS' TESTIMONIES Marcelo Caetano, Economist at Brazil’s National Institute of Applied Economic Research (IPEA)“Part of my work is making speeches about pensions. The great experience that I had in Salzburg and making use of the direction of the Salzburg Statement on Advancing Innovation and Equity in Aging Societies is helping me to improve them and to present better policy recommendations to the general public and to policymakers.”  Sara Watson, Director of ReadyNation“We’ve actively shared the statement in our ReadyNation newsletters. The statement provided great principles and recommendations to accelerate progress for children and forwards the outcomes we all strived for at the session.”  Charlotte Cole, Founder and Executive Director of Blue Butterfly Collaborative“A document like the Salzburg Statement helps support work and propel it forward. It brings together a lot of learning in a very succinct way. It’s a way to help other educators who are working in this domain see that there is an international interest, and to elevate the importance of the most recent thinking around important topics.”  Martha Buell, Director of the Delaware Institute for Excellence in Early Childhood “The statement we created was used to advocate for the inclusion of early childhood development in the University of Delaware’s strategic plan. The draft plan originally had education starting at kindergarten, so it was incredibly useful to have such a document to advocate for earlier education in the plan.” Yael Harris, Senior Researcher at Mathematica Policy Research“Since the session several Fellows and other colleagues have begun to develop a further white paper call to action following the direction in our Salzburg Statement... bringing the concepts from the statement to an international organization focused on health and using health information technology to promote health care improvement.” FIND OUT MORE You can find all the Salzburg Statements online at: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/statements 
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Architects of the Future
Architects of the Future
Louise Hallman 
When Clemens Heller, Richard Campbell, and Scott Elledge convened the first “Salzburg Seminar in American Studies” in 1947, they were reacting to a continent ravaged by two World Wars in just three decades. Inspired by the Marshall Plan for Economics, they sought to launch a “Marshall Plan for the Mind” to reinvigorate European and American intellectual capacity, strengthen connections across the Atlantic, and heal deep post-war rifts.  Fast forward nearly 70 years and Salzburg Global Seminar continues to forge breakthrough ideas and collaborations that bridge global and local divides. Our mission to challenge current and future leaders to solve issues of global concern calls for courage and creativity across generations and sectors.   Most of Europe may no longer be ravaged by war, unlike some regions, but it faces spiraling tensions that can only be resolved through youth engagement and long-term vision. The recent financial and Euro crises, as well as attempts to accommodate desperate waves of refugees crossing the Mediterranean in search of safety in the European Union, have pushed European institutions, governments, and communities to the brink. New solutions and new energy are sorely needed.   “As a trusted neutral organization that has witnessed conflict on its doorstep for decades, Salzburg Global has the responsibility to think and act long-term beyond narrow interests,” explains Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine. Our multi-year programs not only seek to address immediate problems facing individuals and institutions, but also systemic challenges, identifying levers for sustainable and socially just change at all levels.  Many of Salzburg Global’s 2015 programs addressed critical issues faced by young people around the world. These included Youth, Economics, and Violence: Implications for Future Conflict, held in partnership with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which tackled the interconnected problems and opportunities of burgeoning youth populations and marginalized youth in key cities and regions. Early Childhood Development & Education and Untapped Talent: Can Better Testing and Data Accelerate Creativity in Learning and Societies – both in partnership with ETS – examined ways to improve education and social care systems from early years to university to ensure that all young people have the opportunity to fully develop and realize their potential. Two off-site panel discussions in Vienna on Educating Young People for the Jobs of the Future and Washington, DC on The Immigration Crisis: A Preview of Things to Come? explored the need for labor markets and societies to accommodate technological disruption, changing demographics, and human mobility.   In addition to youth futures in the areas of education, employment, and civic engagement, Salzburg Global’s 2015 programs also concentrated on finance and corporate governance systems that shape the prospects of – and will be shaped by – upcoming generations. It is vital to include rising and non-standard perspectives in these high-level dialogues, explains Salzburg Global Program Director Charles E. Ehrlich: “They question conventional thinking, enabling established participants to reassess today’s systems in the light of global challenges.”   Younger professionals need to be at the table not only because they broaden perspectives, but also because they will be the architects of transnational systems on which future prosperity, environmental protection, and the achievement of global agendas such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals will depend. Engaging fresh talent on equal terms is the way Salzburg Global leverages new voices, new brains, and new geographies.  “By bringing smart young voices to the center of interdisciplinary discussions, Salzburg Global empowers next generation leaders to influence current policymakers and affect positive change into the future,” adds Ehrlich.  To equip youth from all backgrounds to become effective leaders, it is critical to invest in their human capital development. Salzburg Global not only opens up opportunities for informal mentoring and network growth through attending sessions on topics from health care innovation to the future of financial regulation, but also runs dedicated capacity-building programs, such as the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum), the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change, and the now-independent Global Citizenship Alliance.  Participating in the annual YCI Forum in Salzburg helps teams of innovators from city hubs around the world develop new skills focused on intra- and entrepreneurship, the latest digital resources, new business models, risk-taking and innovation, the psychology of leadership and emotional intelligence, and cross-cultural communication and negotiating skills. They leave “turbo-charged” to expand their work in their communities. This motivation and upskilling is all the more valuable, as many of these city hubs face significant economic, political, cultural, and/or racial stress.   Reflecting on his participation in the YCI Forum, David Olawuyi Fakunle from Baltimore, MD, USA, said: “I will look back on Salzburg as the five days that changed my life. It gave me a glimpse into what the world can be when everyone is driven by understanding, cooperation, and social good. It is comforting and personally it has strengthened my purpose. Just as importantly, I left with a plan for action. That is what I needed, and the fact that I received it will take my efforts to provide healing in Baltimore to the next level.”  Dafni Kalafati from Athens, Greece added: “What I took back home was a heart full of joy and a mind full of inspiration. Bringing together so many innovative minds can only create a better world to live in.”   Heller, Campbell, and Elledge would likely agree.
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Let’s Talk About Migration - A Preview of What’s to Come
Let’s Talk About Migration - A Preview of What’s to Come
Heather Jaber and Lauren AbuAli 
   The number of people who have been forced to leave their homes worldwide has reached an all-time high since displacement has been recorded. It’s small wonder that some of the most pressing issues facing the world today are then linked to migration and cross-border conflict.  Discussing these challenges is not new for Salzburg Global Seminar, which has been bringing together experts and practitioners to address origins and solutions to these problems for decades. As a prelude to a full session on migration in 2016, Salzburg Global Seminar, NPR and leading DC experts sat down on November 17 at NPR’s Studio One, for a conversation titled: The Immigration Crisis: A Preview of Things to Come? Clare Shine, Vice President of Salzburg Global Seminar, opened the panel by contextualizing the topic of migration. Part of the solution, agreed the panelists, must be dealing with the root causes in the countries of origin. Kathleen Newland, Senior Fellow and co-founder of the Migration Policy Institute suggested that countries continue to view migration in a post-World War lens, seeing it as temporary and therefore failing to address the root causes. “This is the new normal — the future is here.” she said. “It highlights the void that there is… in strategy among world leaders to deal either with the root causes of the massive levels of displacement … or to deal with the displacement itself.” The need to rethink the way we talk about security and safety was a common strand across both panels. It was agreed that the linkage between European security and migration is misleading and the discussion at times “fact-free”. While the fear of terrorist attacks or violence often enters conversations about migration, the speakers emphasized that most migrants are in fact seeking to escape the violence that has erupted in their home countries. “They are fed up with it and they are desperate and want to have a new life,” said Philipp Ackermann, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Washington. “It would be an absolute unfairness to make them responsible for a situation they tried to escape from.” The panelists agreed that it is time to re-frame the situation in terms of its potential- for the people, for receiving countries and for home states.  Michael Clemens, Senior Fellow at the Centre for Global Development, pointed out that 60% of a person’s lifetime earning potential is predicted by their country of birth and over 90% of people stay in that country. If people moved countries, he said, they have the potential to be much more productive and could have drastic positive impact on the global economy.  Shine was reminded of the distinction between policy-based evidence-making and evidence-based policy-making, pointing to a need to structure policies around applicable data.  Likewise, there are strong historical examples of large migrations, including the Vietnamese and Hungarian, which offer lessons not only about the need for international coordination but also about the high potential rewards to all involved.  For further insights from all of our panelists, which also included Nancy Lindborg, President of the United States Institute of Peace, James Hollifield, Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, and Didrik Schanche, Senior Supervising Editor of the International Desk at NPR, listen to the audio below:
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Jonathan Kuttab - “Fanaticism must be confronted by greater freedom, pluralism and openness”
Jonathan Kuttab speaks at the Salzburg Global session on Youth, Economics and Violence
Jonathan Kuttab - “Fanaticism must be confronted by greater freedom, pluralism and openness”
Jonathan Kuttab 
Much of the world is concentrating on the military threat posed by ISIS (D’aash) which uses barbaric methods and hides behind the veil of Islam. Alliances are formed, and new technologies are employed to destroy and bomb their forces, from the air. Their frightening rapid advances are barely stopped by massive military forces being marshaled to fight them. Many in the West assume that, in the end, the military forces of ISIS in Iraq and Syria will be defeated. However, the far more difficult task is addressing the real problems that allowed ISIS to arise and expand so rapidly, and its ability to attract so many young Muslims in the Arab world and beyond to its poisonous ideology. What would entice so many young people to leave their homes and join the fighters of ISIS?  Muslim youth face a bewildering array of challenges and problems, and have every right to be dissatisfied by their circumstances. Most live under undemocratic repressive regimes, which fail to address the real social and economic needs of its population. They have few opportunities for employment or hopes to escape their economic miseries. The early promise of the Arab Spring has descended into even greater entrenchment of the power of oppressive elites. They see corruption, as well as the obscene wealth of a few at the top of their societies, in sharp contrast to the crippling poverty they experience. Jobs are given on the basis of ethnic and tribal identity as well as loyalty rather than merit. They are ashamed at the weakness and backwardness of their societies in the face of Western power and domination. Most of all they are outraged at injustice and are often tempted to seek to scapegoat minorities.  To such youth, the promise of a righteous and powerful Islamic Caliphate that unites all Muslims and courageously fights the West, as it sets to build a new society built on the justice of the Qur’an can be very appealing. ISIS successfully presents itself as the alternative to an evil and corrupt status quo that is supported by Western powers and local despots. To counter this appeal, we need to present young Muslims with a new vision of a better society, not based on religious intolerance, or outmoded ideas, but on progressive, humane, tolerant, and just principles that address their needs and provides methods to deal with current realities. The values that would attract them are not slavish copying of Western styles, music, and methods, but genuine human values that are truly universal, and in reality common to all religions.  At the Salzburg Global program on Youth, Economics, and Violence, youth from around the world met and discussed the problems of youth and methods for reaching them with a new message. Examples from the around the world were discussed: programs that worked, and many that failed as well. The consensus was that unless the legitimate concerns of youth are met, violence and conflict will certainly define their future. Yet the response cannot be to ignore the problems or simply to urge youth to reject violence and fanaticism and support the different regimes under which they live. New programs must be initiated and the creative energy of youth must be harnessed in positive ways that benefit their societies. Mechanisms must be found to empower them and enable them to participate in decision-making in their respective societies. Social media must be used to help organize communities, as well as to circumvent censorship, and to provide outlets for different, non-traditional views. Fanaticism must be confronted by greater freedom, pluralism and openness, rather than suppression, control and even tighter prohibition on the free flow of ideas. Effective avenues for change must be advocated.  Billions are being spent on military equipment and in fighting militant Islamic movements, with an exaggerated emphasis on aerial bombardment. Yet the evidence is that such tactics are not only unsuccessful, but could well be counterproductive. The true battle, for the hearts and minds of people, especially the youth is worthy of a much more concerted effort and the harnessing of resources for change. Failing to make that effort will ensure that the enemy may be defeated, and his organization dismantled, only to return in different, and far more deadly forms under other names. The people of the world – including the Muslim youth of the Arab world – deserve far better.  Jonathan Kuttab was a Fellow at the session Youth, Economics & Violence: Implications for Future Conflict, which was held in partnership with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. For more information, please visit the session page: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/549
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Katindi Sivi Njonjo - A bulging youth population: Infinite possibility or definite disaster for Kenya?
Katindi Sivi Njonjo speaks at the Salzburg Global session on Youth, Economics and Violence
Katindi Sivi Njonjo - A bulging youth population: Infinite possibility or definite disaster for Kenya?
Katindi Sivi Njonjo 
Kenya is at a crossroads on the issue of its young people. With a bulging youth population, the country has a window of opportunity to expand its labor force and increase its economic growth, savings and investments while decreasing its dependency. A big youth population can also be a source of unprecedented challenges, if the numbers are not anticipated and well managed. In cases where these young people have been well educated and where their energy and ingenuity have been sought, young people have been great assets. Segments of youth in Kenya have been able to come up with incredible innovations. Some of these include:  Inserting an ultra-thin chip in the sole of a shoe and subjecting the shoe to motion to generate energy that can be used for charging mobile phones in rural areas;  Attaching flashing lights around a perimeter fence to scare lions and thus reducing human-wildlife conflict; Producing solar-powered LED lanterns that are distributed in rural households while teaching poor youth how to reproduce them in order to create employment and a source of livelihood; Designing a crowdsourcing app that enables people in disaster situations to submit reports by calling, texting or e-mailing, with information then placed on a Google map to connect the need and the help required; Putting youth facts together in a fact book that enables youth concerns to be collated in one place in order to conspicuously bring out trends and policy gaps that can immediately be identified; and Using cartoons, pictures, songs and graffiti to mobilize youth for social change.  However, in cases where these large youth populations are relatively well educated but unemployed, they have become a social challenge and a political hazard.  The continued exclusion of youth from a productive role in the economy has exacerbated crime, drug abuse and vandalism, and escalated the vicious cycle of poverty. An elusive search for status and livelihood has driven many, particularly young men, to religious radicalization and involvement in terror activities. These youth are also ready fodder for political manipulation and expediency. The recent discovery of commercially viable oil and gas in the country is the latest addition to the pot of violence triggers and political contestations.  Whereas many efforts have been put in place to try and create opportunities for young people – such as providing loan facilities to start small enterprises or youth work programs – these efforts have been short-term and tokenistic in nature and have therefore not led to the meaningful change that is required to turn the large youth population into a great asset. In a country where these two realities of advantaged and disadvantaged youth co-exist side-by-side, a systemic approach to provide long term solutions is urgently needed.  Understanding the country’s population growth, structure and distribution will provide insights that help minimize the challenges of a growing youth population. Adequately investing in the enrollment and completion rates of young people in secondary, tertiary and university education as well as improving the quality and relevance of education would sufficiently prepare students for work and life. Additional investment in youth reproductive health, urbanization, innovation, and meaningful employment would certainly help to maximize on the opportunities that youth bulges present. Katindi Sivi Njonjo was a Fellow at the session Youth, Economics & Violence: Implications for Future Conflict, which was held in partnership with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. For more information, please visit the session page: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/549
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New edition published - Youth, Economics, and Violence: Implications for Future Conflict
New edition published - Youth, Economics, and Violence: Implications for Future Conflict
Louise Hallman 
The second edition of the report from the April 2015 session Youth, Economics, and Violence: Implications for Future Conflict is now available online to read, download and share. The new edition now features interviews with many Salzburg Global Fellows, as well as specially commissioned op-eds. Download the report as a PDF
The session Youth, Economics & Violence: Implications for Future Conflict was held in partnership with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. For more information, please visit the session page: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/549 
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